Next #VitanovaUK event: Monday 10 September, University of Reading

Re-reading Dante's Vita nova

See below for details of the next event in our series. Stay tuned for more details.

Re-reading Dante’s Vita Nova, XXV-XXVII

Monday 10 September, 2018, 2-5pm

University of Reading

 

Programme:

2.00-2.15pm: Welcome and introduction

2.15-3.15pm: Presentations on Vita Nova XXV-XXVII

Rebecca Bowen (Oxford): ‘Amore: figura o colore rettorico?’

Paola Nasti (Reading): ‘Dante fra poeti e fantasmi’

Michael Biasin (Reading): ‘L’immagine di Beatrice: il valore estetico della gentilissima’

3.15-4.00pm: Break and refreshment

4.00-5.00pm: Discussion

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Immodesty becomes her?

language: a feminist guide

When the Toronto Globe & Mail announced that in future only medical doctors would be accorded the title ‘Dr’, it probably wasn’t expecting this news to cause much of a stir. But then a historian with a Ph.D objected:

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This tweet provoked an avalanche of criticism–directed not to the Globe & Mail‘s new style-rule, but to the arrogance and conceit of Fern Riddell. And as she later told the BBC, she couldn’t help noticing that her critics were mostly men. A lot of men seemed to be outraged by a woman claiming the status of an expert and expecting others to acknowledge her as such. ‘Humility Dr Riddell’, tweeted one. ‘There’s no Ph.D for that’.

But why should women humble themselves when other people are there to do it for them? As I explained in an earlier post, the treatment of women in professional and public settings…

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Dante and Somerville, an exhibtion – 1-7 February

Rebecca Bowen and I have curated an exhibition to celebrate Somerville’s long history of study and teaching of the poetry Dante Alighieri.

Somerville exhibition landscape poster

The exhibition is made up of items from the library’s special collections, including a 16th-century edition of the Divine Comedy, complete with commentaries a lovely woodcut illustrations, a first edition of Gustave Doré’s 19th-centrury illustrations for Dante’s Inferno, and Mary Somerville’s own copy of the Divine Comedy.

Current graduate and undergraduate students – Anna Branford, Katie Bastiman, Sofia Derer, Aleksandra Rutkowska, and Joanna Raisbeck – have researched and written a lot of the information included in the exhibition. We are also very grateful to Anne Manuel, Sue Purver, and Matthew Roper for their help and advice, without which this exhibtion wouldn’t have been possible.

The exhibition is Library Loggia, and you can ask at the porters’ lodge for directions and access.

Reminder: #VitanovaUK comes to Oxford, 2 February, 2-5pm

Re-reading Dante's Vita nova

You’re very welcome to join us for the third afternoon of presentations and discussions of Dante’s Vita nova, hosted at the Taylor Institution by the University of Oxford on Friday, 2 February. You can also follow the discussion via #VitanovaUK on twitter and through this blog, which will be updated with reports from the day.

The full programme is here:

Oxford Programme

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#VitanovaUK Chapters 13-18, Oxford, 2 February 2-5pm

Take a look at the next event in the series, hosted in Oxford.

Re-reading Dante's Vita nova

We’re looking forward to the next event in the series, to be held in the Taylor Institution Library (Room 2), at 2-5pm on Friday, 2 February.

The day will begin with a welcome at 2pm and presentations will begin at 2.15pm. There will be a coffee break at 3.45pm, followed by a session for general discussion.

We’ll be confirming the remaining details shortly and we look forward to seeing you there!

Oxford Poster

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Was Dante telling the truth? Re-reading Dante’s Vita nova, chapters V-XII at UCL, a report by Kate Sparrow

1 month on from our event at UCL, here’s a chance to refresh your memories of the presentations, or read about them for the first time, if you weren’t able to join us!

Re-reading Dante's Vita nova

UCL, 10 November 2017

image-6-png.jpeg The Giuntina from the UCL Special Collections book display

At the second event in the ‘Re-reading Dante’s Vita nova‘ series, researchers from all over the UK came together with interested students and members of the public to hear new ideas about Dante’s formative early work, the Vita nova, presented by researchers from UCL’s School of European Languages, Culture and Society (SELCS). Dr Catherine Keen and Dr Alex Lee welcomed us on the day, and we were also joined by researchers from the University of Notre Dame via video uplink.

Sophie Fuller (a PhD student at UCL) reports:

The second meeting of the ‘Re-reading Dante’s Vita nova’ project followed a display of special editions of the Vita nova with presentations from both UCL staff and students. Giulia Gaimari, a current PhD student, opened the presentations with an overview of chapters V-XII of the Barbi edition…

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Call for Papers – SEEING (WITH) DANTE – AAIS 2018, Sorrento, 14-17 June #AAIS2018

Please circulate and consider submitting to our call for papers for AAIS 2018:

Dante’s works are thick with visionary and visual scenes. Readers are encouraged to see with Dante as he narrates his love for Beatrice in the Vita Nuova, and to look at and through the Commedia as visual artefact (‘Aguzza qui, lettor, ben li occhi al vero, / ché ‘l velo è ora ben tanto sottile, / certo che ‘l trapassar dentro è leggero.’, Purg. VIII, 19-21). Dante himself is commanded to look innumerable times throughout the poem. The visual textures of Dante’s texts have also provoked a long tradition of visual responses to his works. Building on seminal contributions in recent scholarship (Iannucci, 2004; Braida and Cale 2007;  Lehner, 2017), this panel seeks interventions expounding the role played by the visual arts in the cross-cultural mediation and interpretation, appropriation and popularisation of Dante’s textuality and imagery from the early modern era to postmodernity. The intention is historicize the modes of visualisation of Dante’s poetry in both traditional and more experimental forms of representation ranging from painting, illustration and sculpture to film, graphic novels and videogames. In mapping the dynamics of this Dante’s productive responses in visual arts, the panel will discuss:

  • The visuality of Dante’s works: from the lyrics to the Commedia, in terms of their material imagery, visual and visionary language, episodes of ekphrasis, synaesthetic and optical illusions and effects. Dante’s seeing, and the reader as observer.
  • ·The construction of the visual canon: from Botticelli’s Disegni per la Divina Commedia (1480-1495) to Robert Rauschenberg Thirty-Four Illustrations for Dante’s Inferno (1958-1960) and beyond.
  • The dialectic of centrality/marginality at play within the canon: i.e., the macroscopic predilection for the representation of the Commedia over the Vita Nuova and other minor works; as well as the microscopic selection of episodes and passages from the poem itself.
  • The multiple uses of illustration as commentary: from early modern manuscripts to nineteenth-century illustrated editions for young and adult readers.

Please submit abstracts of not more that 200 words, a brief biographical note, and requests for audio-visual equipment to David Bowe (University of Oxford) david.bowe@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk and Federica Coluzzi (University of Manchester) federica.coluzzi@manchester.ac.uk by 20 December 2017.